Take the Ketunlenkki circular trail -

Cross a suspension bridge and climb to admire the scenery from Katajavuori hill.

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Fire brings life (Määkijä)

A majority of Repovesi’s forests have been used for forestry at some point in time. The last trees were felled in the 1990s, before the park was founded. The commercial harvesting of trees resulted in a uniform forest, with trees of roughly the same age and almost no rotting trees at all. Burning these types of forests significantly increases their biodiversity and natural value. Forest fires are nature’s way of regenerating forests.

A controlled burn was made here at Määkijäniemi in 2008. The burn area was a dense, approximately 40-year-old pine stand. Natural forest typically have trees of different sizes, ages and species as well as a lot of dead and rotting trees. Metsähallitus does forest restoration work in Repovesi in co-operation with UPM, which is the owner of the Aarnikotka forest Nature Reserve. Read more on restoration at https://www.metsa.fi/en/nature-and-heritage/habitats/

Restoration burns are controlled. The sites to be restored are isolated so they can be burned safely. In order to prevent crown fires from spreading, trees are removed from around the restoration site in question. Ground fires are blocked from spreading by digging fire trenches or using a road as a boundary for the restoration site.

Forest fires are one of the biggest factors in shaping the natural forests of the boreal forest zone. Today, extensive forest fires rarely occur in Finland. However, some of the forest species are dependent on forest fires, and many species benefit greatly from the habitats created by fire. Charred wood can remain preserved in a forest for several hundred years. For example, the spring pasque flower and even woodpeckers appear quickly after a fire: the spring pasque flower takes advantage of the increased exposure to sunlight and the Eurasian three-toed woodpecker can easily find insects to feed on.

Read more about habitat restoration at: www.metsa.fi/web/en/habitatrestoration